Concerns from Patients

Please note that as things change rapidly, Q&As and guidelines will be updated. Review this website often to ensure you have the most up to date information or consult your leader if you have concerns or identify discrepancies. 

 

How can patients protect themselves and their family? 

Follow the same advice that public health officials recommend for the cold and flu season: wash your hands often with soap and water, cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, avoid others who are unwell, and stay home when you are sick.

The most important thing you can do to prevent coronavirus and other illnesses is to wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your face.

Cover your mouth when you cough so you're not exposing other people. If you are sick yourself, stay away from others. Contact your health-care provider ahead of time so you can be safely assessed. Listen to Dr. Eleni Galanis answer this question.
If a patient presents with coughing or fever, should I ask them if they have travelled to an affected area? 
It is always best practice to ask a patient about their travel history if they present with respiratory illness.
Will wearing a mask protect me/my patients and/or residents? 

Masks should be used by sick people to prevent transmission to other people. A mask will help keep a person's droplets in.

It may be less effective to wear a mask in the community when a person is not sick themselves. Masks may give a person a false sense of security and are likely to increase the number of times a person will touch their own face (e.g., to adjust the mask).

Health-care workers will wear surgical masks, eye protection and gowns in order to protect themselves and other patients. During health-care procedures in which aerosol sprays may be generated (for example, when giving certain inhaled medications), health-care workers should wear specialized masks. 

How can we protect patient confidentiality?  

​Protecting patient confidentiality is essential. Please follow routine privacy policy. Emails are not appropriate for sharing confidential patient information. Also be aware that group emails sent to colleagues can become public or be shared with media, which may fuel anxiety around unconfirmed rumours and cases.

We are reporting only when we get a positive case, but are not sharing private patient information with the public.​​

If a patient presents with coughing or fever, should I ask them if they have travelled to an affected area? 
​It is always best practice to ask a patient about their travel history if they present with respiratory illness.​
 

 

This page last updated Mar 31, 2020 2:41pm PDT