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FROM THE DAILY SCAN: COVID-19 SHOWN TO INCREASE RISK OF BLOOD CLOTS

Not long after being diagnosed with COVID-19, Jordan Hoey was referred to the Thrombosis Clinic at St. Paul’s Hospital.

When Jordan Hoey learned that his partner, a healthcare professional, had been exposed to COVID-19 in the workplace, he knew he would be at risk of contracting the virus. However, he had no idea it would ultimately lead to multiple pulmonary embolisms - blood clots in both his lungs.

According to the World Thrombosis Day website, blood clots are a known complication among COVID-19 patients and can contribute to other life-threatening medical conditions. With this top of mind, the St. Paul’s Hospital’s Thrombosis Clinic sees more need now than ever to present a free Zoom event this Thursday, Nov. 26 to educate the public about symptoms and risk factors.

Hoey, 29, is a CPC engineering technologist with BC Hydro who has always been fit and healthy. But after hearing about his partner’s exposure last May, he promptly got tested and was diagnosed with COVID-19. Initially, Hoey’s symptoms were heavy fatigue and a general achiness. A fever that lasted 10 days soon followed and was accompanied by muscle aches, headaches and ongoing fatigue.

About two weeks after his diagnosis, he started coughing up blood. At St. Paul’s Hospital’s ER, he was referred to the Thrombosis Clinic. There, he found out he had multiple pulmonary embolisms. Even though he had no underlying health issues, he was prone to clots because COVID-19 creates a prothrombotic state in patients - an abnormality of blood coagulation that increases the risk of blood clots.

“As my fever began to subside, I thought I was in the clear. Blood clots were the last thing on my mind,” said Hoey. “Little did I know what the next few months would bring.”

At the clinic, he was given blood thinners but suffered bad chest pain for several months afterwards. It’s not known whether or not the pain resulted from the clots or COVID-19 itself.

READ THE FULL STORY ON THE DAILY SCAN.

This page last updated Nov 24, 2020 5:58pm PST